Newspaper headlines: Gove goads Boris and the BBC faces 'backlash'


Newspaper headlines: Gove goads Boris and the BBC faces ‘backlash’


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The Metro is among the papers to lead on the Conservative leadership contest and the ongoing controversy surrounding Michael Gove’s past drug use. Its headline “Gove goads Boris” is a reference to his apparent verbal swipe at Boris Johnson, as the Tory leadership campaign officially begins.

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Three pithy sub-headlines on the front page of the Financial Times sum up the current state of the race – suggesting Mr Johnson “remains frontrunner”, Jeremy Hunt’s campaign is gaining “momentum” and Mr Gove is “on the attack”.

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The Daily Telegraph says Michael Gove’s “personal attack” on Boris Johnson is an act of “desperation”. It says Mr Gove’s chances of becoming leader of the Tory party is fading away as Jeremy Hunt overtakes him as the biggest potential rival to Mr Johnson.

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The Guardian says Mr Gove is trying to “claw his way” back in to the race – after his campaign was “blown off course” at the weekend after revelations about cocaine use in the 1990s. It says Mr Gove pledged to govern for “overlooked families and undervalued communities” before he launched a series of “personal attacks” on Mr Johnson.

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The Sun takes the opportunity to get a drug-related pun on its front page, as it says Mr Gove “now tries crack” – with an asterisk explaining it means a “cheeky joke” he made about Mr Johnson’s sex life. The paper explains that Mr Gove urged his rival “whatever you do, don’t pull out” of the leadership contest.

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The Times focuses on policies rather than personalities in its front page coverage, detailing what it calls Mr Johnson’s plans of “tax cuts for the rich”. It says the announcement led to the “first proper skirmish” of the contest, with him facing accusations that he was allowing the Tories to be portrayed as the “party of privilege”.

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“Backlash over BBC betrayal of the elderly” reads the front page of the Daily Mail. It is among the papers to lead on the BBC’s decision to allow only those over-75s in low-income households, where one person receives the pension credit benefit, to be eligible for free TV licences.

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The i reports an “outcry” over the decision that it says will mean “two-thirds” of over-75s will now have to pay. Its front page does include a line of response from the BBC, which says the alternative would have been the closure of major services.

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The Daily Express front page leads with a call for its readers to sign a petition opposing the BBC’s changes to the TV licence fee. The paper says the move is a “kick in the teeth for millions of pensioners”.

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The Daily Mirror headline spells it out in numbers, claiming that “3.7m OAPs lose free TV licences”. But alone among the papers, it suggests that anger is being aimed at the government because the Conservatives made a pledge in the 2017 election that the free TV licences for over-75s would be retained.

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In other news, the Daily Star leads on reports of Olympic hockey gold medallist Sam Quek being “trolled” on Twitter for saying the BBC’s Women’s World Cup panel were beautiful.

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