Homeless deaths nine times higher in deprived areas


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Deaths of homeless people were nine times higher in deprived areas of England than in the least disadvantaged areas, analysis of data has shown.

There were an estimated 21 deaths in Manchester , 18 in Birmingham, 17 each in Bristol, Lambeth and Liverpool and 15 in Camden in 2017.

About 2,627 homeless people died in England and Wales from 2013 to 2017.

Deaths were recorded in 156 local authority areas in 2017, the Office for National Statistics (ONS) said.

When weighted by population, the 11 deaths estimated in Blackburn with Darwen gave the area the highest rate.

The ONS said: “The rate of deaths per 100,000 population in the most deprived tenth of local areas in England was 9.2 times that of the least deprived tenth.

“For Wales, the rate of deaths per 100,000 population in the most deprived tenth of local areas was 3.4 times that of the least deprived tenth.”

Deaths of homeless people in 2017

Rate per 100,000 population

The breakdown followed the release of figures for England and Wales in December, with an estimate of 574 homeless deaths in urban areas in 2017, compared with 26 in rural areas.

The ONS included people sleeping rough or using emergency accommodation, such as homeless shelters and hostels, at or around the time of death.

Ben Humberstone, head of health analysis for the ONS, said: “The figures show that the deprivation level of an area has a real impact. Many more people die homeless in the most deprived areas of England and Wales and 95% of the deaths are in urban areas rather than rural areas.”

The number of people counted or estimated to be sleeping rough in England fell slightly in 2018 for the first time in eight years .



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